MSD Manual

Please confirm that you are not located inside the Russian Federation

honeypot link

Ginger

By

Laura Shane-McWhorter

, PharmD, University of Utah College of Pharmacy

Last full review/revision Jan 2022| Content last modified Jan 2022
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION

What is ginger?

Ginger is a flowering plant with a root (rhizome) that has long been used in cooking and in medicine and is thought to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Antioxidants Antioxidants The human body needs various vitamins and minerals in order to thrive. Many of these nutrients can be found in whole, non-processed foods such as fruits and vegetables. However, most modern... read more protect cells against damage by free radicals, which are highly chemically active by-products of normal cell activity. The stem contains substances called gingerols, which give ginger its flavor and odor. Shogaols are another type of active ingredient. Ginger can be used fresh, dried, or as a juice or oil.

What claims are made about ginger?

Does ginger work?

Scientific studies suggest ginger is effective for pregnancy-related nausea and postoperative nausea and vomiting, but not for nausea caused by chemotherapy.

Some studies have shown that ginger moderately decreases knee and hip pain due to osteoarthritis, but other studies do not confirm that benefit.

Ginger is being evaluated for type 2 diabetes, and emerging evidence has shown a slight decrease in HbA1C (a form of hemoglobin that indicates average blood sugar levels).

What are the possible side effects of ginger?

Ginger is usually not harmful, although some people experience a burning sensation when they eat it. It may also cause digestive discomfort and cause a disagreeable taste in the mouth. Ginger may increase the risk of bleeding.

What drug interactions occur with ginger?

People who take ginger and drugs that prevent blood clots may need to be monitored for development of bleeding or blood clots.

Recommendations

Ginger is relatively safe and may be effective for pregnancy-related nausea and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Ginger may also help relieve painful periods from primary dysmenorrhea.

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION
quiz link

Test your knowledge

Take a Quiz! 
iOS ANDROID
iOS ANDROID
iOS ANDROID
TOP