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Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccine

By

Margot L. Savoy

, MD, MPH, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University

Last full review/revision Jun 2021| Content last modified Sep 2022
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION

Different formulations of the vaccine are available.

For more information, see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Haemophilus Influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine information statement.

Administration

The Hib vaccine is given as an injection into a muscle. As a part of routine childhood vaccination Childhood Vaccination Schedule Most doctors follow the vaccination schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC—see the schedule for infants and children and the schedule for older children... read more , doses are given at age 2 months and 4 months or at age 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months, depending on which formulation is used. In either case, a final dose is given at age 12 to 15 months (for a total of three or four doses).

All children should be vaccinated.

The Hib vaccine is also recommended for older children, adolescents, and adults who were not vaccinated and who are at increased risk of this infection, such as the following:

If people have a temporary illness, doctors usually wait to give the vaccine until the illness resolves (see also CDC: Who Should NOT Get Vaccinated With These Vaccines?).

Side Effects

Occasionally, the injection site becomes sore, swollen, and red. After being vaccinated, children may have a fever, cry, and be irritable.

More Information

The following are some English-language resources that may be useful. Please note that THE MANUAL is not responsible for the content of these resources.

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION
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