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Pulmonic Stenosis

By

Guy P. Armstrong

, MD, Waitemata Cardiology, Auckland Valvular Disorders

Last full review/revision Aug 2021| Content last modified Aug 2021
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Topic Resources

Pulmonic (pulmonary) stenosis is a narrowing of the pulmonary valve opening that blocks (obstructs) blood flow from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery. It is often present at birth (congenital) and thus affects children.

The pulmonic valve is in the opening between the right ventricle and the blood vessels going to the lungs (pulmonary arteries). The pulmonic valve opens as the right ventricle contracts to pump blood into the lungs. Certain disorders causes the valve opening to be narrowed (stenosis).

Symptoms include chest pain (angina), shortness of breath, and fainting.

Diagnosis of Pulmonic Stenosis

  • Physical examination

  • Echocardiography

Through a stethoscope, doctors may hear the characteristic murmur of pulmonic stenosis.

Treatment of Pulmonic Stenosis

  • Balloon valvuloplasty

In people with symptoms and/or severe stenosis detected by echocardiography, balloon valvuloplasty may be done. In this procedure, the valve is stretched open using a catheter with a ballon on the tip, which is threaded through a vein and eventually into the heart. Once inside the valve, the balloon is inflated, separating the valve cusps. In rare cases, the pulmonic valve is replaced with a bioprosthetic valve.

More Information

The following is an English-language resource that may be useful. Please note that THE MANUAL is not responsible for the content of this resource.

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version
Click here for the Professional Version
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