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Hypertensive Arteriolar Nephrosclerosis

By

Zhiwei Zhang

, MD, Loma Linda University

Last full review/revision Mar 2021| Content last modified Mar 2021
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Hypertensive arteriolar nephrosclerosis is progressive kidney damage caused by long-standing, poorly controlled high blood pressure (hypertension).

  • The person may develop symptoms of chronic kidney disease such as loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, itching, and confusion.

  • The person may also have symptoms related to damage to other organs caused by the high blood pressure.

  • Doctors make the diagnosis based on the person's history of high blood pressure as well as ultrasonography and blood test results.

  • Treatment is strict control of blood pressure.

Hypertensive arteriolar nephrosclerosis results when long-standing (chronic) hypertension High Blood Pressure High blood pressure (hypertension) is persistently high pressure in the arteries. Often no cause for high blood pressure can be identified, but sometimes it occurs as a result of an underlying... read more High Blood Pressure damages tissue in the kidneys, including small blood vessels, glomeruli, renal tubules, and interstitial tissues. As a result, progressive chronic kidney disease Chronic Kidney Disease Chronic kidney disease is a slowly progressive (months to years) decline in the kidneys’ ability to filter metabolic waste products from the blood. Major causes are diabetes and high blood pressure... read more develops. Chronic hypertension High Blood Pressure High blood pressure (hypertension) is persistently high pressure in the arteries. Often no cause for high blood pressure can be identified, but sometimes it occurs as a result of an underlying... read more High Blood Pressure can also damage the heart, causing heart failure Heart Failure (HF) Heart failure is a disorder in which the heart is unable to keep up with the demands of the body, leading to reduced blood flow, back-up (congestion) of blood in the veins and lungs, and/or... read more Heart Failure (HF) . Hypertension also increases the risk of heart attack Acute Coronary Syndromes (Heart Attack; Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina) Acute coronary syndromes result from a sudden blockage in a coronary artery. This blockage causes unstable angina or heart attack (myocardial infarction), depending on the location and amount... read more Acute Coronary Syndromes (Heart Attack; Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina) and stroke Overview of Stroke A stroke occurs when an artery to the brain becomes blocked or ruptures, resulting in death of an area of brain tissue due to loss of its blood supply (cerebral infarction) and symptoms that... read more .

Hypertensive nephrosclerosis progresses to end-stage renal disease (severe chronic kidney disease Chronic Kidney Disease Chronic kidney disease is a slowly progressive (months to years) decline in the kidneys’ ability to filter metabolic waste products from the blood. Major causes are diabetes and high blood pressure... read more ) in only a small percentage of people. However, because chronic hypertension and nephrosclerosis are common, hypertensive nephrosclerosis is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal disease.

Risk factors include older age, poorly controlled moderate to severe high blood pressure, and other kidney disorders (for example, diabetic nephropathy Complications of Diabetes Mellitus People with diabetes mellitus have many serious long-term complications that affect many areas of the body, particularly the blood vessels, nerves, eyes, and kidneys. (See also Diabetes Mellitus... read more Complications of Diabetes Mellitus ). Blacks are at increased risk, but it is unclear if the risk is increased because poorly treated high blood pressure is more common among blacks or because blacks are more genetically susceptible to kidney damage caused by high blood pressure.

Symptoms

Diagnosis

  • Routine blood tests

  • Other tests to detect damage to other organs and other causes of kidney damage

The diagnosis may be suspected when routine blood tests indicate deteriorating kidney function in a person with high blood pressure. Doctors make the diagnosis when the physical examination or test results show evidence of organ damage caused by high blood pressure. Such damage may be changes in the retina observed with an ophthalmoscope or evidence of heart abnormalities detected with electrocardiography Electrocardiography Electrocardiography (ECG) is a quick, simple, painless procedure in which the heart’s electrical impulses are amplified and recorded. This record, the electrocardiogram (also known as an ECG)... read more Electrocardiography (ECG) or echocardiography Echocardiography and Other Ultrasound Procedures Ultrasonography uses high-frequency (ultrasound) waves bounced off internal structures to produce a moving image. It uses no x-rays. Ultrasonography of the heart (echocardiography) is one of... read more Echocardiography and Other Ultrasound Procedures .

Urine testing should be done to detect other disorders that may cause kidney disease.

Treatment

  • Control of blood pressure

Treatment involves strict blood pressure control. Most people need to take a combination of drugs, including an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) or an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, and possibly calcium channel blockers, thiazide diuretics, or beta-blockers. Weight loss, exercise, and salt and water restriction also help control blood pressure. Chronic kidney disease Chronic Kidney Disease Chronic kidney disease is a slowly progressive (months to years) decline in the kidneys’ ability to filter metabolic waste products from the blood. Major causes are diabetes and high blood pressure... read more should be managed by restricting fluid and salt intake and sometimes dialysis Dialysis Dialysis is an artificial process for removing waste products and excess fluids from the body, a process that is needed when the kidneys are not functioning properly. There are a number of reasons... read more Dialysis .

Prognosis usually depends on how well blood pressure is controlled and the degree of kidney damage. Usually, kidney damage progresses slowly. After 5 to 10 years, only 1 to 2% of people develop significant kidney dysfunction.

More Information

The following are some English-language resources that may be useful. Please note that THE MANUAL is not responsible for the content of these resources.

  • American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP): AAKP improves the lives of patients through education, advocacy, and promotion of a sense of community among patients with kidney disease.

  • American Kidney Fund (AKF): AKF provides information about kidney disease and kidney transplant, needs-based financial assistance to help manage medical expenses, webinars for medical professionals, and opportunities for advocacy.

  • National Kidney Foundation (NKF): This clearinghouse provides everything from information on the basics of kidney function to access to treatment and support for people with kidney disease, continuing medical education courses, and research opportunities and grant support for medical professionals.

  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK): General information on kidney diseases, including research discoveries, statistics, and community health and outreach programs.

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